Old News – World War I Begins

Major news from the past. After a month of negotiations had broken down, on July 28th 1914 Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Germany and Russia mobilized on the 30th. Germany declared war on Russia on August 1st. Here some reports from the first couple of days when everyone thought that it might be possible to keep the war within just a couple of countries.

THE MONROE COUNTY MAIL

Thursday, July 30, 1914

CZAR TO HELP SERBS

holman-ad-1914-07Moment Austria Crosses Servian Frontier Russia Will Fight.

Well Informed Corespondent States That Russia Took Preliminary Mobilization Steps the Moment Council of Ministers Decided That Servia’s Sovereignty Must Be Protected–German War Office Shows Great Activity.

London, July 29.–The St. Petersburg correspondent of the Morning Post says he is in a position to state positively that the moment the Austrians cross the Servian frontier, Russian mobilization orders will be published and Russia will take the field with all the consequences involved in such action.


ENGLAND GETTING READY

Quietly Preparing to Meet Any Emergency That May Occur in Coming Conflict.

London, July 29.–Austria’s forma; declaration of war against Servia cannot be said to have disappointed expectations, although it shattered some over sanguine hopes.

Nothing has yet reached London as to actual operations. Rumors of the occupation of Belgrade and the invasion of Servia via Mitrovitza are not confirmed, but official confirmation has been received of the seizure of Servian ships on the Danube.

As regards the general international situation it may be said that while it is still necessarily extremely grave it can be said that hope of restricting the quarrel to Austria and Servia has not yet been lost.

Germany’s and Austria’s courteous rejection of Sir Edward Grey’s efforts to prevent an international struggle has banished the idea of an ambassadorial conference, but this has been superseded by direct negotiations at St. Petersburg between Russia and Austria.

These negotiations according to Russian dispatches are going on with such smoothness that well informed circles in London last night hoped that it might be possible to prevent the trouble overstepping its present limits.

It is reiterated in London that Austria has made it clear that she does not aim at territorial conquests in the Balkans and this is regarded as good ground on which to build the hope that Russia will refrain from military interference.

Great Britain, while abstaining from anything which would be provocative of alarm on the part of Austria and her friends, is quietly making preparations for any contingency that may bring her within the scope of the continental troubles. There is great activity at the war office and the admiralty.


READY TO ANSWER CALL

Reservists of Both Austria and Servia in this country Preparing to Return.

New York, July 29.–The announcement that Austria had declared war upon Servia gave impetus to the activities that for the last three days have kept the members of the two consulates in this city working early and late transacting official business and keeping their respective countrymen informed as to the situation and as to what is expected of them in the event of a call to arms.

Acting under instructions from the war office in Vienna, the Austria consul general made preparations to transport the several thousand reservists in this who are expected to answer the call to the colors within the next two weeks. More than a score of officers, who have been called back by cable, are expected to sail before the end of the week.

No instructions came to the Servian consul and he was kept busy informing inquirers not to get excited until events have worked themselves out to some extent.

Professor Michael I. Pupin of Columbia university, who is the acknowledged leader of the 100,000 Serbs in this country, motored to town from his summer home in Connecticut and immediately entered into conference with Paul M. Paviovitch, who is in charge of the Servian consulate. It is understood that Professor Pupin has already sent hundreds of telegrams to his countrymen asking them for funds to equip and maintain additional troops.

WDYTYA – Tomorrow

Jesse-Tyler-Ferguson-2014On the next episode of “Who Do You Think You Are” (WDYTYA) Jesse Tyler Ferguson will look for information on his ancestors. Jesse is known for portraying Mitchell Pritchett on the ABC sitcom “Modern Family,” That role has garnered him 5 Emmy Award nominations for Best Supporting Actor.

Jesse ends up following the path of his great-grandfather took on the Alaskan trail in 1898. It appears that the expedition was part by boat and part by pack horse. It was at that time when many people were headed to Alaska because of the discovery of gold. Temperatures in Alaska can and did change quickly dooming many expeditions of people who were no prepared for the trip.

WDYTYA airs at 9 p.m. (eastern and western tomes) on the TLC channel.

Top Songs of 1964; #14

beatles-a-hard-days-night

US Single cover

The Beatles are back on the top of the record charts in 1964. This time with “A Hard Day’s Night,” the title song to the movie of the same name. The song was written by John Lennon with only minor suggestions from Paul McCartney. The title comes from a malapropism attributed to Ringo Starr after a long session of recording music.

The song was the number one song on the Cash Box record chart for the weeks of July 19 – August 8. It was also at the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart from July 26 – August 8.

The Beatles have their own website that has a link to iTunes which is the only official site that you can download Beatles songs.

NY Tax Assessments, 1799 – 1804

I discovered a new group of records on Ancestry.com that has tax records for NY State. “New York, Tax Assessment Rolls of Real and Personal Estates, 1799-1804″ contains records for most of NY State except New York City (Manhattan). The records have the person’s name, value of real estate, value of personal property and tax to be paid. Some records have a description of the real estate like “house,” “farm,” “barn,” “mill,” etc. As I have many ancestors that lived in New York State in his time, I found close to 25 ancestors listed in these tax records. In a couple of cases , there was two generations listed of the family. It helped to indicate the family residence and the value of their farm.

The page, below, is from 1801 for the Town of Northampton, Ontario County. At that time, that town consisted of all the land west of the Genesee River except for what is now Steuben County. Duncan, Daniel and John Anderson each had property valued at $100 and had to pay 11 cents tax for the year 1801. William Barber only had personal property worth $36. His tax for that year was only 4 cents.

northampton-tax-1801
If you subscribe to Ancestry.com you can use this direct link to search the tax records. If you don’t subscribe to Ancestry.com you still can get free access to these tax records. You would need to start on this webpage from NY State Archives. Then enter any NY State zip code in the box provided and click on “submit.” This will take you to a special web page just for NY State records. Scroll down on the “included data collections” until you see “New York, Tax Assessment Rolls of Real and Personal Estates, 1799-1804″ and click on that. Then you can search for your NY State ancestors for free and see who you can find.

 

Old News – Picnics and Anniversaries

More news from the past. This time Rochester Catholic Church events.

THE CATHOLIC COURIER

Friday, July 24, 1914

City Parish News

ads-1914-07-24Interesting Budget of Happenings Gathered by Our Reporter


St. Boniface

The St. Boniface “Footlight Club” the dramatic organization of this church will hold their first annual outing Sunday, July 26th, at the Silver Lake assembly grounds. A special car will convey them to the lake and will be escorted by the well known “Giv and Ebs” Brass Band, all of whom are members of this club and who were given a big reception at their last public appearance.

A varied and amusing number of sports are on the day’s program as well as a baseball game between the “Juveniles” and the “Characters.” Mr. Edward Hettig will umpire this battle. A chicken dinner will await the actors at the Walker House immediately following the sports and distribution f prizes. A special committee was appointed for this occasion and through their zealous work the outing is sure to be a success.

The sixth annual picnic of the St. Boniface Young Mens club will take place Wednesday, July 29th, at Grand View Beach and the committees are making a special effort to have a program that will tickle the palate of gloom. As usual the “Zips and Peps” will cross bats and a long list of races are also carded. The chartered cars will leave from Cor. Gregory St. and South Ave. at 8 o’clock and the members are urged to be on time.


St. Bridget’s

The young Ladies’ Sociality held a basket picnic at Newport on Tuesday of this week, which proved to be a very enjoyable occasion.

Among the interesting events were a ball game; a fifty yard dash in which Miss Francis Kelly established herself the title of champion sprinter of the organization. The three legged race was won by Misses Molly Kelly and Helena Nelligan. The egg race was awarded to Miss Agnes Thibault and the prize for the broad jump was obtained by Miss Helena Nelligan.


Holy Family

Saturday, July 25th, the feast of St. James, our pastor celebrated the 39th anniversary of his ordination into the priesthood.


Holy Redeemer

Next Tuesday will mark the 26th anniversary of the ordination to the priesthood of Rev. Jacob F. Staub, rector of Holy Redeemer church in Hudson Ave. A religious celebration of the event will be held on Sunday morning, when the rector will conduct solemn high mass at 8:30 o’clock, at which members of the different societies of the church will attend in a body.

On Tuesday and Wednesday evenings receptions will be held in Concordia Hall by the people of the parish, in celebration of the parish, in celebration of the rector’s silver jubilee. Vocal and musical programmes will be given.

1964 Rochester Riot

1965-eiotWe are approaching an anniversary of a sad occasion in Rochester history. On Friday, July 24, 1964 it began when police arrested a 19 year-old intoxicated black man at a block party. When rumors of police brutality began to spread, an angry crowd formed on Joseph Avenue and became violent.It wasn’t until the 26th that peace was restored. In all four were dead (three in a helicopter crash) and 350 injured. Almost a thousand people were arrested and 204 stores were either looted or damaged.

I have no first hand knowledge of the riot as I didn’t move to Rochester until about 10 years later. I have been watching a few features that have been on local TV already. There will be more features over the next few days. They deal not only with the cause of the riot but how far we have come and what still needs to be done in the future to make conditions equal for everyone.

WDYTYA – Returns

WDYTYA-bannerThe genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are? returns for a new season tomorrow (July 23rd) on the TLC channel. The person discovering their ancestry in this new episode is Cynthia Nixon, known primarily as Miranda Hobbes on the show “Sex and the City.” Cynthia discovers a mystery of deceit and murder that involves her great-great-great grandmother. Previews show scenes filmed in a Missouri prison. This episode airs at 9 p.n. in eastern and western time zones.

If you missed last season’s episodes or want to watch them again, they start at 1 p.m. in the afternoon. Then at 8 p.m. TLC is airing the very first WDYTYA episode featuring Sarah Jessica Park from 2010 that originally aired on NBC. My TV guide also shows that at 10 p.m. TLC will show the episode with Matthew Broderick. That episode is also from 2010 and originality aired on NBC.

All together you can see 10 hours of WDYTYA tomorrow.

Click here to see the preview for Wednesday’s episode featuring Cynthia Nixon

Indexing Event

WorldwideIndexingEventFamilySearch is asking for assistance in indexing records this weekend. The previous record was just a little over 49,000 indexers on a day after the 1940 US census was released. They are trying to reach 50,000 volunteer indexer in one day. sHere is their press release:

Join volunteers from around the world on July 20 and 21 for an international history-making event! The goal? For 50,000 indexers and arbitrators to submit at least one batch in a 24-hour period! Do more if you would like, but one batch is all that is required to be counted in the record!

This remarkable goal will require help from every current indexer and arbitrator out there, plus many new volunteers, but it can be achieved if generous volunteers like you commit to participate. So mark your calendar, and spread the word! Share this invitation with your Facebook friends and family now. Everyone is needed. Everyone can make a difference!

No matter where you live or what language you speak, you can participate and add to this historic worldwide achievement.

The event begins at 00:00 coordinated universal time (UTC) on July 21, which is 6:00 p.m. mountain daylight time (MDT or Utah time) on Sunday, July 20. It ends 24 hours later, at 23:59 UTC (or 5:59 p.m. MDT) on Monday, July 21.

One batch is all it takes. Don’t miss your chance on July 20 and 21 to be part of this history-making event! Plan now to get involved and add your name to the record-setting legacy!

New indexers can visit https://familysearch.org/indexing/ to learn more about how to join the FamilySearch indexing effort.

The time for this event translates as from 8 p.m. Saturday to 8 p.m. Sunday in the eastern US time zone or 5 p.m Saturday to 5 p.m. Sunday western US time zone.

You will need to create an account on FamilySearch if you haven’t done that already. There are many indexing projects to pick from. Currently there are some New York City passenger lists (1847–1874) that need indexing. Also some records of the NY National Guard (1906–1954) are only about 25% indexed. FamilySearch also has many obits to  be indexed from many states. Each indexing project comes with it’s own instruction and sample records. Please make sure you read those instructions before you start. Depending on what project you pick, a batch of records takes from 20 minutes to an hour. I’ll bet you have that much time available this weekend.

Also during this indexing event Dear Myrtle is having what she calls a “GeneaSleepOver.” She and others will be broadcasting on Google Plus for the entire 24 hours. You can find out the link to the webcast and more details on this web page.

 

Erie Canal 2014 Guide

2014-erie-guideA few years ago when I was at a genealogy conference I mentioned to someone that I was from Rochester. They only knew of Rochester as a point on the Erie Canal. But they didn’t know that the canal still existed. To remind people what the canal used to be and what it is now, the National Park Service puts out a guide every year. The guide is 8 pangs (13.5 x 11 inches) with old postcard views and new pictures. The center of the guide has a map that includes not only the Erie Canal but also the other canals that connect to it (Champlain Canal, Oswego Canal and Cayuga-Seneca Canal). The guide is available, while they last, at Rochester Public Library, Rochester Museum & Science Center, Wayne County Office of Tourism, Buffalo Convention & Visitors Bureau and other sites. If you can’t find the guide near you, you can download it from this web page along with other brochures and maps. They are all in PDF format that can be viewed using the free Adobe Reader program available on the web.

The Erie Canal doesn’t have any commercial traffic any more but efforts to clean up along the canal over the last 20 years have made a difference. It is a great place to walk, bicycle and kayak. One of the best things to see is a boat being lifted or lowered in one of the locks. Also watching a lift bridge as it makes way for a boat is amazing. Those old iron bridges creak as they slowly rise and lower. Plus there are numerous tours along the canal. There is even a place near Medina where a road goes under the canal. I have a picture somewhere of me standing under the canal. You just never know what you see along the mighty Erie Canal.

Old News – Tidbits from Brockport

Here is some more news from the past. This time some small items from Brockport, NY.

THE BROCKPORT REPUBLIC

Thursday, July 16, 1914

LOCAL AND VICINITY NOTES

IN NEIGHBORING TOWNS AND VILLAGES

Look out for pickpockets who have been operating extensively of late on the trolleys between Rochester and Ontario Beach Park.

From June 25th to August 9th the labor laws of the state will allow women in the canning factories to work 66 hours a week instead of 54. This schedule will be allowed up to Oct 10th if a special permit is obtained.

ad-1914-07-16The ladies of the Woman’s Relief Corps are to be entertained at a Thimble Party at the home of Mrs. Freida Buhl on Spring street Friday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Buhl expect to remove to Branchford, Canada in the near future.

The Eastern Star picnic for the 34th District will be held at Olcott Beach Wednesday, July 29.

The Active and Dye Hose companies of Albion are planning a carnival to be held the week of July 27 for the benefit of the fire truck.

Batavia is paying the highest tax rate in its history, $18.65 per $1000.

The B. L. & R. road are to put freight package service between Rochester and Buffalo beginning the 1st of August.

Physicians and druggists must now use blanks furnished by the state for prescriptions of habit forming drugs.

The latest pension bill, if it passes will give $20 a month to all soldiers’ widows.

Fifteen counties of the state have now been placed under quarantine by the department of agriculture in the attempt to check the spread of rabies.


NEW VILLAGE ORDINANCE

Moved by Mr. Gordon that the following ordinance be adopted:

Sec. i. No person shall drive or operate any motorcycle, automobile or other motor vehicle within the limits of the Village of Brockport unless the muffler, so called, shall be securely closed so as to prevent unnecessary noise from the exhaust from the engine of said vehicle.

Sec. 2. Who ever shall violate any provision of this ordnance shall for each offense forfeit and pay the sum of Ten Dollars for the use of said Village.