Old News – Chautauqua

Chautauqua Meetings started Chautauqua, NY as an adult education movement. They eventually spread across the US. The Chautauqua meetings would have teachers, musicians, entertainers, preachers and speakers of every kind. Though the movement would fade in the 1920s and 1930, the original in Chautauqua, NY is still going on and is very popular.


THE HONEOYE FALLS TIMES

Thursday, July 6, 1916

Chautauqua Week.

Alton Packard is a wondrous fun make. He is one of the best cartoonists in the land. He is a musician of high order; also he is a capital story teller. You can travel many leagues and into many far countries and find none better. When he works before you you may be too busy laughing to notice it, but you will remember afterwards how amazingly versatile his work is. When we say Packard is a twin six, 120 horsepower, smooth running, sure performing entertaining we haven't half said it all. Twelve years and more Packard has coaxed tears of laughter down the cheeks of countless thousands of people. He made his name great first as a cartoonist on some of the great daily papers. Now he talks to his audience in person, getting more fun out of it himself and bringing them much more enjoyment. He is the best "grouch getter" in the country. His slogan is "Rare fun well done." No more need be said except-fifth day of Chautauqua week.

Alton Packard is a wondrous fun make. He is one of the best cartoonists in the land. He is a musician of high order; also he is a capital story teller. You can travel many leagues and into many far countries and find none better. When he works before you you may be too busy laughing to notice it, but you will remember afterwards how amazingly versatile his work is. When we say Packard is a twin six, 120 horsepower, smooth running, sure performing entertaining we haven’t half said it all. Twelve years and more Packard has coaxed tears of laughter down the cheeks of countless thousands of people. He made his name great first as a cartoonist on some of the great daily papers. Now he talks to his audience in person, getting more fun out of it himself and bringing them much more enjoyment. He is the best “grouch getter” in the country. His slogan is “Rare fun well done.” No more need be said except-fifth day of Chautauqua week.

Chautauqua Week in Honeoye Falls, with common consent, seemingly, has come to be looked upon, after one short years’ experience as a permanent institution in its Community life. It is quite desirable as well as commendable to our people that this is a fact as no other movement of recent years has accomplished so much for the educational uplift of the busy classes in middle life whose opportunities have been limited through circumstances than this.

The foresight of Dr. Vincent, the venerable founder of the summer assembly of which this latter movement is an offshoot, now seems prophetic, for through his humanity and energy has been developed an ideal which is surely moulding our national life.

When the opportunity of a local chapter was first pretested to Honeoye Falls it met with hearty response from “Chautauquans” several of whom being charter members of the earlier movement, rallied in the aid of the Redpath Bureau and with others to the number of fifty became the financial guarantors of the Chautauqua week that we are privileged to enjoy this week.

With a program of splendid features to open with a year ago it was a great relief for the local committee to sell up to the limit pledges for this season’s course before the first year’s program was completed. They had tasted the good things and were crying for more.

The school house grounds were secured for the erection of the big tent, and all was in readiness for the opening on Monday afternoon when Joe R. Hanley of Iowa, as the “official can opener,” made the opening address, a searching study of modern conditions, presented with keen, vivid, humorous and intensely patriotic nature of an Irishman. Lovett’s Highland Band and John B. Ratto were the evening entertainers..

 

These four young ladies with beautiful voices and attractive personalities will present "Two Programs of Charm" the fifth day of Chautauqua. each member of this company is an artist of several season's experience. Natural ability and finished artistry plus personality have contributed to the popularity and success of the Marigolds. Their programs are replete with exquisite songs. humerus members and unique costumed selections and are wholesomely entertaining.

These four young ladies with beautiful voices and attractive personalities will present “Two Programs of Charm” the fifth day of Chautauqua. each member of this company is an artist of several season’s experience. Natural ability and finished artistry plus personality have contributed to the popularity and success of the Marigolds. Their programs are replete with exquisite songs, humerus numbers and unique costumed selections and are wholesomely entertaining.

WWII Ration Books

ration-bookMy family saved 8 ration books from the WWII period. You were given the books to be able to get items that were rationed because of the war. There were different kinds of books. Some were for food and others for gasoline. You had to read the local newspaper or visit the grocery store to find out what each stamp would get you that week. It is amazing that a couple that I have still have some “stamps” still attached.

You may not have thought about using WWII war rations books for genealogy. My parents moved ever year or two because my father was a manager for a chain of groceries stores. The chain would promote him by moving him to a bigger store. That means my parents lived in many towns. In the ration book in the picture I learned the address that they were living at in Sodus, NY in 1942. That was an address that I didn’t have before looking at these ration books. It also says that at age 27 my father only weighed 138 pounds. I was over that weight at age 15.

Another gasoline ration book shows that in 1944 my parents had a 1935 Plymouth. It also gives the license plate number.That helps when a plate is visible in an old family photo. Also it has a different address as my parents had moved again.

Eastman Theatre Programs

eastman-theatre-magazineI uploaded 6 programs at the Eastman Theatre between 1927 and 1939. Three of them are titled Eastman Theatre Magazine and are 8 pages of previews of future movies and movie news. The program part of those magazines shows that you would get an overture by the orchestra, theater news, a short movie, a musical act, sometimes a cartoon and the feature movie. Prices ranged from 20 to 50 cents for the entire show. These even told movies that were playing at the Piccadilly Theater in Rochester.

Another of the programs from 1931 is for a concert by pianist José Iburbi. From 1936 to 1944 he would be the principal conductor for the Rochester Philharmonic. After that he ended up in Hollywood where he would play the piano and also have a few lines in movies.

These are the new Eastman programs:

Top Songs of 1966 – #17

StrangersinthenightThe pop music charts in 1966 had all kinds of music; rock, folk, patriotic and easy listening. Frank Sinatra was on the top of the charts with “Strangers in the Night” for one week. The melody was credited to German, Bert Kaempfert with the English lyrics being claimed by a few writers. Most people  credit the lyrics to Charles Singleton and Eddie Snyder. The song was used as an instrumental in the 1966 movie A Man Could Get Killed. It was the title song for Sinatra’s 1966 album Strangers in the Night, which became his most commercially successful album.

“Strangers in the Night” ended up winning the Grammy Award for Record of the Year, as well as Frank winning the Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. One of the most memorable and recognizable features of the song is Sinatra’s scat with the syllables “doo-be-doo-be-doo” as the song fades
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“Strangers… ” was the number one song on the Cash Box record chart for the week of June 12 – 18. On the Billboard Hot 100 chart it knocked The Beatles’ “Paperback Writer” off the top spot for the week of June 26 – July 2 but the Beatles came back to the top the next week.

Top Songs of 1966 – #16

PaperrainIt’s The Beatles that are again back on the top of the record charts in 1966. “Paperback Writer” is a song about a writer that is desperate need of a job. He has even written a paperback based on a book by a “man named Lear.” This is another Lennon-McCartney song but John later said that Paul wrote most of the song.

“Paperback Writer” was on the top of the Cash Box record chart for the weeks of June 25 – July 2 (2 weeks). On the Billboard Hot 100 chart it was known for being at number one for two non-consecutive weeks (June 19 – 25 and July 3 – July 9). The song that knocked The Beatles off the top spot was not a rock song. You will have to wait to find out who recorded that song.

The B-side of the single was “Rain,” a very imaginative sounding song. The Beatles were experimenting with new recording and over-dubbing techniques.

Free Records Search

Find my past logos.inddFindMyPast is offering free access to over 1 billion genealogical records now through July 4th. This will include free access to: 

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In order to get to look at the records you will have to create an account. That doesn’t mean that you have to become a subscriber.

I did a search for some of my family and I can say that I didn’t find anything that had already seen. It appears that a good share of the marriage records came from FamilySearch. When I did a search for some family records, I did get references to records that were behind the pay wall.

Top Songs of 1966 – #15

Stones-Paint-It-BlackThe Rollings Stone were back on the top of the music charts for the second time in 1966. This time it was “Paint It Black” that brought the group more attention. This was their third number one song in the US and 6th in the UK. On the Cash Box record chart it was number one for just the week of June 5 – 11. On the Billboard Hot 100 chart it stayed at the number one spot for two weeks (June 5 – 18).

The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. It was recorded in Los Angeles. This was known as the first number one song that featured a sitar (Indian instrument). The sitar was played by guitarist Brian Jones.

The Rolling Stones continue to record and tour. They finished a tour of South and Central America earlier this year. They have two concerts in California and one in Las Vegas scheduled for October. Their official website has lots to explore on the long history of the group.