Honeoye Falls HS Yearbooks

320.pdfThe New York Heritage website has added a digital collection of high school yearbooks from the Honeoye Fall Central School (later Honeoye Falls Lima High School). This collection was digitized by the Mendon Public Library.  The Honeoye Falls – Lima Yearbooks Collection contains those yearbooks for the years of 1954 through 2009. These yearbooks are in PFD format and can be viewed online or downloaded and saved to your computer.

Old News – Gambling Raid

Illegal gambling has always been a problem. It doesn’t say what kind of gambling was being done at this place in Brockport.

The Brockport Republic
Brockport, NY

Thursdays, February 25, 1915

GAMBLING ROOM RAIDED

THE PROPRIETOR ARRESTED NAMES OF OTHERS TAKEN

A Clean Scoop by the Official.
No Tip-off this time.

ad-2015-02-25Brockport officials are receiving congratulations on their recent efforts toward ridding the village of gambling rooms. The raid made early Sunday morning brought before the public notice a gambling room run it is said by Walter King. It was located in the upper rooms of a block owned by H. N. Johnston on the south side of Market street. For some weeks the place had been under suspicion and the officers had awaited an opportune time to take final steps toward closing it. On Saturday evening the final necessary information was received and shortly after midnight the officers headed by Police Justice Homer C. Holmes armed with the private knock made their to the place. Much to their surprise it was not found necessary to use the knock as the door opened to permit two men to go out just as they reached the door. The proverbial ostrich was was set in it compared with the absurd efforts of some of the men in their endeavors to hide. The door at the rear opening out on a narrow wooden platform was guarded from the outside by two officers and they found it all they could do to hold the door shut. Some even attempted to climb through a small transom. When the occupants had been thoroughly convinced by the police that they were unable to escape the names of about twenty-five men were taken. Walter King was arrested and this week has paid a good sized fine. No other prosecutions have been started so far but those found in the place are to be closely watched and according to the law, proceedings may be instituted any time during the next five years. Most of those found in the place were ordinary run of persona who might be expected there but there were also several men and boys of whom much more might be expected. One of the fellows caught thought seriously enough of the affair so that he made a hurried trip to Chicago Sunday night.

Early Rochester Family Records

I have completed a project that I have wanted to do for many years. That is transcribing the genealogies in the newspaper column titled “Early Rochester Family Records by Anah Babcock Yates. Her column ran in the Post Express from from July 9, 1910 to Apr. 13, 1912 when it abruptly ceased. Mrs Yates was one of the founders of the Rochester Historical Society and an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She also was state genealogist of the New York Historical Society for many years. She had access to genealogical data that others did not have. The title of the column is misleading as there are family records from the whole of Monroe County, not just Rochester. Only problem is that her newspaper column contained very few reference sources.

I put the transcribed columns in the “biographies” section of the GenWeb of Monroe County website. Start on the Biographies index page. The newspaper columns are on pages 41 to 47.

Mrs. Yates also did the same kind of column in two other local area newspapers. Some day I hope to transcribe those columns.

Genealogy Roadshow – Feb. 24

roadshow-2“Genealogy Roadshow” is having the finale for this season on Tuesday, Feb. 24th. This episode is going to be memorable stories from the first two seasons of the series. The episode airs on most PBS stations at 8 p.m.
You can watch some of the episodes on the “Genealogy Roadshow” video page. They also have some clips. PBS only keeps episodes available for a limited time then they go away so if you want to watch episodes, don’t wait.
Although “Genealogy Roadshow” is done for this season another genealogy series comes back again next month. More information coming before that season premier.

Filed under TV | Tagged 

Old News – Ice Skating

This winter has been cold and great weather for ice skating and other winter sports. This article refers to Eastern Widewaters which was a basin on the Erie Canal where boats could stop overnight. What is left of the Eastern Widewaters is now called Lake Riley in Cobbs Hill Park. For ice skating in Rochester in 2015 see this page

THE POST EXPRESS
Rochester, NY

Wednesday, February 19, 1915

Please Do Not Telephone Mr. Laney at His Home; Skating Is Good

lady-1915-02-19Superintendent of Parks C. C. Laney says he is glad that so many people in Rochester like to skate on the on the park ponds and he tries to keep then as thoroughly unformed as to the status of the ice day by day as is humanly possible, but he does think that skaters should have enough consideration for his comfort to refrain from dragging him to the telephone from his meals and even from his bed to inform them if the sport is “toward” upon their favorite lakes.

The superintendent says that within the last three days, he will bet he has answered no less than three score such calls at his own residence and he says that there are sufficient inquiries at the park board office to keep both his telephones humming until midnight.

And now for the benefit of those skaters who get their information from the newspapers Mr. Laney announces that there is good skating on every park except Highland. So many blades have been cleaving the ice at Eastern Widewaters that it has become badly cup up and is being planed t-day in preparation for the horde of skaters this evening. All the other ponds, except at Highland are in ideal condition.

There is, however, no coasting and the park authorities are of the opinion that that sport has passed for the year. (Note: In this case, “coasting” refers to sledding.)

Local History & Genealogy Dept. Closed for Renovations

local-historyThe Local History & Genealogy Department of the Central Library of Rochester & Monroe County will be closed for renovations on Thursday, February 19 and Friday, February 20. The department will re-open to the public at 10:00 am on Saturday, February 21. The renovations will accommodate the new Walter F. Becker Digital History Center, providing patrons state-of-the-art access to scanning equipment and other cutting-edge digital technologies. The new center will include seven ScanPro digital microfilm/microfiche readers, as well as a variety of photo and document scanners– all of which will be available free of charge.

Road Blocks Researching Mental Patients

pittsburgh-post-gazetteThere was this article  in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette this last Sunday which tells of trying to investigate family members that were former patients in mental hospitals. Some of the road blocks are related to government restricts of records from even over a hundred years old.  Some very basic information, such as burial locations are sometimes withheld. The article tells of the frustrations that family genealogist have when trying to get even the basic information on their relatives.

RootsTech Blog Posts and Videos

rootstechRootsTech 2015 is over and you there are many blog posts on what took place at the convention. Randy Seaver has collected blog posts from 47 genealogy  bloggers. As some bloggers have many posts, there are over 100 posts to read, in total. That list may increase over the next couple of days as some of the bloggers may not have made it back home, yet.

If you weren’t able to see all the streaming videos from RootsTech, then you will be able to see the recorded sessions. Currently this page, has all of the recorded sessions from Thursday and some from Friday. Within the next few days, the rest of those recorded sessions from Friday and Saturday should be added to that web page. Hopefully they will include the full session with Donny Osmond where he not only talks about doing family history but also sings a few songs.

FamilySearch has this “channel” on You Tube that has 10 short videos from RootsTech 2015.

Dear Myrtle has this “channel” on You Tune where she did what she calls her “Ambush Cam.” These are 12 short interviews that she did on the exhibit floor.

It may take you a few days to read all of the blog posts and watch all the videos from this year’s RootsTech. It will be worth your time to find out what is new in genealogy.

RootsTech Streaming Schedule

rootstechRootsTech has announced the schedule of genealogy sessions that they will be streaming for FREE online. All these listed times are Mountain time zone. So adjust for your time zone. The live stream will be right on the homepage; RootsTech.org.

I think there is a mistake on this schedule. It doesn’t list the Friday General Session which should be listed from 8:30 to 10:00.

Thursday

Feb. 12:

8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Thursday General Session (Dennis Brimhall, Mike Mallin & Tan Le)
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 30 Pieces of Tech I Can’t Live Without D. Joshua Taylor
1:30 p.m.-2:20 p.m. You’ve Mastered the Census and Basic Search, What Next? Karen Auman
3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. What’s New at FamilySearch Devin Ashby
4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Getting Started in Genetic Genealogy Diahan Southard
Friday

Feb. 13:

10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Innovator Summit Challenge Event
1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. Building a Genealogy Research Toolbox Thomas MacEntee
2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Bring Your Ancestor Back to the Future Anne Leishman
4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. The Write Stuff. Leaving a Recorded Legacy: Personal Histories, Journals, Diaries, and Letters Valerie Elkins
Saturday

Feb. 14:

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m. Saturday General Session (A. J. Jacobs & Donny Osmond)
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Finding the Living among the Dead: Using the Internet to Find Your Living Cousins Amy Archibald
1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. Family History on the Go Using Phones and Tablet Apps Crystal Beutler
2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Personal History Triage: How to Tell the Best Ten Stories of Your Life Alison Taylor
4:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m. Finding Your Family on Newspapers.com Peter Drinkwater

Old News – Letters from the War

WWI still is going on a hundred years ago. These are excerpts from letters from men that were in the thick of the fighting.

THE FAIRPORT HERALD

Wednesday, February 10, 1915

WAR MAIL BAG BRINGS MANY VIVID LETTERS FROM THE FRONT

Chief of Police of King's Lynn, England, examining unexploded shell dropped in German air raid.

Chief of Police of King’s Lynn, England, examining unexploded shell dropped in German air raid.

The mail bag is just now a prolific source of interest. Vivid letters from soldiers at the front or in hospital bases and scrappy notes from the tars with the “silent fleet” mirror the causalities of war with a wealth of intimate detail and picturesque personal touches impossible to the harshly censored was correspondent.

The following is written from the front by Corporal Trainor:

“We have had German cavalry thrown at us six time in the last four hours, and each time it has been a different body, so that they must have plenty to spare. There is no eight hours for work, eight hours for sleep and eight hours for play with us, whatever the Germans may do.

“The strain is beginning to tell on them more than on us, and you can see by the weary faces and trembling hands that they are beginning to break down.

“One prisoner taken by the French near Courtral sobbed for an hour as though his heart were broken, his nerves were so much shaken by what he had been through.”

Sergeant Major McDermott does not write under ideal conditions, but his style is none for the worse for the inspiration furnished by shrieking shell:

“We are waiting for something to turn up to be shot at, but up to now, though their artillery has been making a fiendish row all along our front, we haven’t seen as much as a mosquito’s eyelash to shoot at.

“There is a fine German airship hanging around like a great blue bottle up in the sky, and now and then our gunners are trying to bring bring it down, but they haven’t done it yet.

“It’s the quantity, not the quality of the German shells that is having effect on us, and it’s not so much the actual damage of life as the nerve rocking row that counts so much.”

Equally interesting are some of the men with the British fleet. Tom Thorne, writing to his mother in Sussex, says:

“Before we started fighting we were all very nervous, but after we joined in we were all happy and most of us laughing till it was finished. Then we all sobbed and cried.

“We were in action on Friday morning off Helogoland. I had a piece of shell as big as the palm of my hand go through my trousers and as my trouser legs were blowing in the breeze. I think I was very lucky.

“We call the Germans the chocolate soldiers,” writes a soldier from the front, “because they appear to be always eating chocolate. When they attack or are attacked, when they are wounded or sick, by night and day, it’s all the same. We have found some of their dead with cakes of chocolate between their fingers.

“During one of our Christmas armistices one of the German soldiers told me that the chocolate ration had bee recommended by scientists as a convenient and exceedingly nutritious food and had sustained them very well in some of their marches where other foods were not available.”